thks 260 years adam smith, 60 fazle abed & soros, 20 fei-fei li

NormanMacrae.net -Economist pro-youth economist -bravo sir fazle abed & jack ma

Norman Macrae : Books & Surveys at The Economist

 Can you help Economist Diary celebrate decade since Norman Macrae passed with Games of World Record Jobs

thanksgiving 2019 rereading ackoff system mapping 

december 2019 : death of fazle abed - greatest hero of end poverty and women leading the first sustainability generation

hello 2020 - sadly covid is turning our era into that of the baby-zoomers - we expect nature will get exponentially more impatient-260 years into era of humans and machines adam smith scholars invite worldwide friends of livesmatter to glasgow cop26 nov 2021 as last best chance--  

help xglasgow.com prep road to glasgow nov 2021 via singaporeun.comaug and davosagenda.com

CONTACT EconomistFuture.com  chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk - text and whatsapp +1 240 316 8157  linkedin UNwomens Twitter myUNUSlab -

2025 report authors' prologue

chapter 6 fintech for the unbanked, media true to goal of end poverty

chapter 7 changing manufacturing employment

chapter 8 changing education

chapter 9 digital infrastructure revolution

chapter 10 -changing politicians

:here - you can download whole book and update language of humans artificial intel

Lets update 1984 NO)W with young visions like Greta

In 2008 Norman Macrae asked his family to remember his lifes work with 10 yeras of youthy journalism out of bangladesh - here's a summary

Curriculum of Entrepreneurial Revolution was started up in The Economist by father Norman Macrae 1 2 to debate 4 greatest ignorances that the rich'swestern world was starting the 4th quarter of the 20th century with.

 

...................................................

Not understanding what failed system is identified with rural poverty -eg lack on infrastructures of electricity, educational-communications, running water and sanitation, roads and so time-sensitive supplies of life critical goods including basic nutrition infants need


World RecordPOP

Vested interests spinning societies to turning blind eye to slum and semi-urban poverty

World Record Empowerment
  • Women4
  • Asia4
  • Africa4
  • Americas4

Denial of our species biggest danger that 3 halves of the world - women, youth, poorest as yet have less than 10% voice in what futures compound

World Record Open Edu
  • 5 billion elearn with Yazmi
  • Mandela Extranet
  • Ma-Lee
  • Gandhi-Italy

.consider the first worldwide generation what open system mathematicians like Einstein and Von Neumann  posed as the grand challenge of designing technologies of connectivity around a higher order system than constitutions rule over

Help millennials end inconveniences of 20th C politicians & tv?

2010 sample tour of Norman Macrae- 15 years into his career at The Economist, Norman is asked to sign his first survey

his greatest debates on youth futures start in 1972 when he saw students experimenting with digital networks:

 

Norman Macrae last journalist mentored by Keynes, whose General Theory concluded  1) "increasingly economics rules the world" and 2) greatest risk to youth's productivity is elderly macroeconomists. Norman's 40 years of journalism at The Economist aimed to help net generation prevent ruin by economists by collaborating entrepreneurially in 10 times more productivity out of every community. On seeing 50 youth on a digital net in 1972, Norman coined term Entrepreneurial Revolution -2012 being 40th year of debates of www.erworld.tv

 

 

 surveys below

Share optimistic determination of investing in next generation interacted by friends of The Economist’s Unacknowledged Giant with the founding fathers of digital media’s ecology!  

RSVP chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk 

 

ER The French word Entrepreneur "between take" originates in cutting off heads of royalty *the one per cent of late 1700s" for monopolising peoples' productive assets- let's agree more joyful ways of transferring assets for youth to be productive, how do we deal with over-government crisis identified in The Economist since 1978...? Political and other bureaucrats now control more of GDP by so-called western democracy than ever that of old priests,  kings or communists. 2010s is the decade where changing .gov will determine sustainability of all our children's children 

News
The Economist. Saturday, 23 December 1978.
Pages 45-48. Vol 269, issue 7060.

 

The Economist. Saturday, 22 January 1972. 2011-2012: 40th year: dialogue started with networks of The Economist in 1972: how to prevent macroeconomists collapsing global financial economy in 2012.

 

KNOWLEDGE WEBS

Retrospective: Silicon Valleys for All 1982Netfuture 1984; Sunshades in October &  Other Errors of North's Macroeconomists 1 2 

 

Norman Macrae nearly 4000 leaders @ The Economist. By tradition only surveys were signed. 1962, Norman's 14th year of 40 at The Economist saw his first survey "Consider Japan" signed. Next year: he led a team to USSR: survey forecast communism would die within a quarter of a century. Decade later 1972 survey" gave western economists a maximum of 40 years to prevent meltdown of global financial system; whence his joyful surveys on Entrepreneurial Revolutionmapped where leaders were redesigning the net generation's most productive futures - forecasting in 1975 the asian pacific worldwide century and journalising the first book of the internet's economic and social business media significance in 1984.

 


 

ER's Ten green bottles 

Breakthrough erroneous mindsets of macroeconomics before there is nothing left at all:

#1 Entrepreneurs-and good news media owners - are not political- they connect left right and centre dialogues

Verify Top 2 pro-youth economists:  Norman Macrae 1923-2010 & the most exciting microeconomist of our epoch & net generation : Muhammad Yunus born 1940 ...
The Economist. Saturday, 25 December 1976. Pages 41-43. Vol 261, is...

 

Italian 76 translator of Entrepreneurial Revolution Romano Prodi

,,,,,,

 

Postcards from Entrepreneurial Paris 2011

 at Embassy of France in DC - the French rediscovery of the love of their original idea "entrepreneur" would love to see danone communities launch an english language version at same time

usa co-producer SfH french embassy 24 hubs of MIT and obama startups and mcs and G.Am

PDF]

Program

File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View
Jan 31, 2011 DC: Embassy of France... Dinner. Welcome by François Delattre, Ambassador of France... Moderated by Ira Gershkoff, MITEF Chapter Vice Chair ... President Barack Obama's Startup America Initiative ...
www.france-science.org/IMG/.../Program_MIT_Enterprise_Forum_2011.pdf
.

Better care at one eighth the cost?
Cover Below
The Economist. Saturday, 28 April 1984.
Pages 23,24. Vol 291, issue 7339.

News from the Yunus Partners in End Nurseless Villages pioneered by Nike Girl Effect , Glasgow Caledonian and village girls  

march 2011 princess anne caps first class of Grameen Girl nurses

April Glasgow team lead celebrations starting  World Healthcare Congress - xtremely affordable teams

 

250 years yunus to adam smith

 

 

According to General Theory of Keynes:  increasingly only economics rules the world;

Thus 2 opposite system-round choices :  dismal macroeconomics of old wall street, or youth's joyous microeconomics& sustainability exponentials rising

Norman Macrae's main books include:

1955 London Capital Market
1963 Sunshades in October
1984 with Chris Macrae The 2024 Report - aFuture History of The Net Generation to 2024 republished over next 2 years in many languages as 2025 Report or  2026 Report with a 1993 update in Swedish : Den Nye Vikingen - Sweden's Future 1995-2015
1992 John Von Neumann = Biography
plus Scenario chapters of Hackett's 3rd world war series aimed at military wanting to downsize themselves so that peace dividend is invested in net generation's borderless world

 

 

 

 

 

Radical Reaction : Advert to book compiling several early Hobarts from Institute of Economic Affairs 

The Economist. Saturday, 14 October 1961.Page 34. Vol 201, issue 6164.

Consider Japan Part 1 - Survey by Norman Macrae

The Most Exciting Example
News
The Economist. Saturday, 1 September 1962.Pages 53,54. Vol 204, iss...

 

Consider Japan Part 2

Lessons for Developers?
The Economist. Saturday, 8 September 1962.Pages 57-61. Vol 204, iss...

 

Changing Russia - Survey led by Norman Macrae

The Mustard Seed
The Economist. Saturday, 1 June 1963.Pages 16,17. Vol 207, issue 6249.

Ad of Norman Macrae's Book Sunshades in October (no free reviews allowed of books by E-journaists)

The Economist. Saturday, 16 November 1963.
Page 57. Vol 209, issue 6273.


The Economist. Saturday, 25 September 1965.
Page 3. Vol 216, issue 6370.

No Christ on The Andes - What's Gone Wrong? 

The Economist. Saturday, 25 September 1965.
Pages s9-s11. Vol 216, issue 6370.

 The German Lesson
A survey by Norman Macrae
The Economist. Saturday, 15 October 1966.
Page s3. Vol 221, issue 6425.

 

German Lessons 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 29 October 1966.
Page 4. Vol 221, issue 6427.

The Economist 
Contents
The Economist. Saturday, 27 May 1967.
Page 3. Vol 223, issue 6457.

The Risen Sun 
Norman Macrae's Second Survey on Japan
1967 Japan Rising part 2.1The Economist. Saturday, 27 May 1967.
Page s9. Vol 223, issue 6457.

The Risen Sun - II (The Import Balancing Trick)

The Economist. Saturday, 3 June 1967.
Page s7. Vol 223, issue 6458.

The Economist 
Contents
The Economist. Saturday, 3 June 1967.
Page 3. Vol 223, issue 6458.


Cover
The Economist. Saturday, 3 June 1967.
Page s1. Vol 223, issue 6458.

Institute of Economic Affairs  ()
Ad The Economist. Saturday, 17 June 1967.
Page 58. Vol 223, issue 6460.

 

Old France in a Hurry (Billions from Somewhere)

The Economist. Saturday, 18 May 1968.
Pages s11,s12. Vol 227, issue 6508.

 

The Green Bay Tree - Survey of South Africa

The Economist. Saturday, 29 June 1968. Page s9. Vol 227, issue 6514.

Envoi (Why isn't there a bloody black revolution? And will there be one?)

The Economist. Saturday, 29 June 1968. Pages s45,s46. Vol 227, issu...

South Africa 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 6 July 1968.
Page 4. Vol 228, issue 6515.

South Africa 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 27 July 1968.
Page 4. Vol 228, issue 6518.

The Economist 

The Neurotic Trillionaire (The Mormons Oust The Pugilists)
A Survey of Mr Nixon's America
The Economist. Saturday, 10 May 1969.
Pages s11,s12. Vol 231, issue 6559.

America 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 17 May 1969.
Page 4. Vol 231, issue 6560.

The Economist 
Contents
The Economist. Saturday, 9 May 1970.
Page 3. Vol 235, issue 6611.

The Phoenix is Short-Sighted 
A survey of Western Europe - to be the next superpower or to make America's mistakes on a grander scale?
The Economist. Saturday, 16 May 1970.
Page s9. Vol 235, issue 6612.

The New Europe 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 23 May 1970.
Page 4. Vol 235, issue 6613.

The New Europe 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 6 June 1970.
Page 4. Vol 235, issue 6615.

Education & Courses 
Ad  The Economist. Saturday, 20 February 1971.
Page 81. Vol 238, issue 6652.

 

From enemy she became lover The Economist provides a special issue ...

Britain's industrial backyard 
News
The Economist. Saturday, 1 January 1972.
Pages s17-s21. Vol 242, issue 6697.

A revealing yesterday 
Business and Finance - A survey  "The Next Forty Years"of Multinational Business in which Norman Macrae first argues for blending the roles of exponential economics and future historian. Checklist: macroeconomic short-term fixes prompted by world wars needing urgent addressed if world's financial system is not to collapse in 2010s
The Economist. Saturday, 22 January 1972.
Pages s5-s8. Vol 242, issue 6700.

The Economist 
Contents
The Economist. Saturday, 22 January 1972.
Page 3. Vol 242, issue 6700.

Multinational business 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 29 January 1972.
Page 6. Vol 242, issue 6701.

Multinational business 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 5 February 1972.
Page 8. Vol 242, issue 6702.

Ecology 
Letters - a letter on future history of Arab-Islamic civilisation by Ambassador of Jordan
The Economist. Saturday, 12 February 1972.
Page 4. Vol 242, issue 6703.

The next 40 years Because of widespread interest, the survey 
Ad
The Economist. Saturday, 8 April 1972.
Page 20. Vol 243, issue 6711.

 

 

 

 

 

No one quite like them 
Brian Beedham Survey of Japan
The Economist. Saturday, 31 March 1973.
Pages s7,s8. Vol 246, issue 6762.

The people we have become 
Survey of UK
The Economist. Saturday, 28 April 1973.
Pages s3-s8. Vol 247, issue 6766.


Contents
The Economist. Saturday, 28 April 1973.
Page 3. Vol 247, issue 6766.

The people we have become 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 12 May 1973.
Pages 4,6. Vol 247, issue 6768.

The Watergate 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 7 July 1973.
Page 4. Vol 248, issue 6776.

Tyrannosaurus Rex 
News
The Economist. Saturday, 1 December 1973.
Pages s35,s36. Vol 249, issue 6797.

The socialist revolutionaries are at take-off point 
Survey of Algeria
turday, 13 April 1974.
Pages 41-45. Vol 251, issue 6816.

 

 

After 10 years (The Economist changed editors  The departing one, Alastair Burnet, on what we have been trying to do

The Economist. Saturday, 26 October 1974.
Pages 15,16. Vol 253, issue 6844.


Asia Pacific Century
The Economist. Saturday, 4 January 1975.
Page 3. Vol 254, issue 6854.

The embarrassed heir 
The Economist. Saturday, 4 January 1975.
Pages 15-18. Vol 254, issue 6854.

A garden is lovesome 
The Economist. Saturday, 4 January 1975.
Pages 22-28. Vol 254, issue 6854.

Japan 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 18 January 1975.
Page 6. Vol 254, issue 6856.

Pacific century 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 1 February 1975.
Page 6. Vol 254, issue 6858.


The Economist. Saturday, 5 April 1975.
Page 6. Vol 255, issue 6867.

 
Survey of America's Third Century
The Economist. Saturday, 25 October 1975.
Page 3. Vol 257, issue 6896.

Recessional for the second great empire? 
News

Pages s3,s4. Vol 257, issue 6896.

 
Classified Ad

Page s42. Vol 257, issue 6896.

America's third century 
Letters

Page 4. Vol 257, issue 6898.



Page 10. Vol 257, issue 6899.



Page 10. Vol 257, issue 6903.

 
Survey of The Coming Entrepreneurial Revolution (ER)

Page 3. Vol 261, issue 6956.

Ten green bottles 
News
The Economist. Saturday, 25 December 1976.
Pages 41-43. Vol 261, issue 6956.

Towards the industrial archipelago 
News

Pages 31,32. Vol 262, issue 6958.

Bottom-up is best 
News

Page 35. Vol 262, issue 6958.

Granulated Capitalism - a survey responding to ER
>
Page 3. Vol 262, issue 6958.

The coming entrepreneurial revolution 
Letters
>The Economist. Saturday, 22 January 1977.
Pages 4,6. Vol 262, issue 6960.

Tomorrow's capitalism 
Letters

Page 4. Vol 262, issue 6962.

Big can be beautiful 
A response to ER by 2 managers of General Electric Company

Pages 45,46. Vol 262, issue 6966.

Son of Buggins 
News

Page 34. Vol 262, issue 6966.

Quiet flows the chart 
News
The Economist. Saturday, 5 March 1977.
>

Variety, mobility 
News

Pages 38,45. Vol 262, issue 6966.

Oakeshott's archipelagos 
News

Pages 34-38. Vol 262, issue 6966.

Even more entrepreneurial 
Norman Macrae replies to nearly 3 months of correspondence on Entrepreneurial Revolution

Pages 33-38. Vol 262, issue 6967.

 
Contents

Page 3. Vol 262, issue 6967.

Britain and Europe 
Letters

Page 4. Vol 262, issue 6969.

Contents
Page 3. Vol 263, issue 6975.>

 

Tomorrow's workshop -

2 billion people - novel suggestions for East Asia

News
>
Pages s7-s11. Vol 263, issue 6975.

Asia 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 4 June 1977.
Page 7. Vol 263, issue 6979.

A miracle has been postponed 
Survey China
The Economist. Saturday, 31 December 1977.
Pages 13-15. Vol 266, issue 7009.

On a wing, a prayer and a string 
News
The Economist. Saturday, 31 December 1977.
Page 24. Vol 266, issue 7009.

Will we no' go back again? 
News
The Economist. Saturday, 31 December 1977.
Pages 33,34. Vol 266, issue 7009.

The sleeping giant 
News
The Economist. Saturday, 31 December 1977.
Pages 19-22. Vol 266, issue 7009.

The rules return 
News

Pages 39-41. Vol 266, issue 7009.

China 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 21 January 1978.
Page 6. Vol 266, issue 7012.

Towards a Keynesian Friedmanism 
News
The Economist. Saturday, 17 June 1978.
Pages 37-41. Vol 267, issue 7033.

Spine-chillers 
Reviews
The Economist. Saturday, 22 July 1978.
Pages 108,109. Vol 268, issue 7038.

Coping stones (Walter Bagehot)
Reviews

Page 125. Vol 269, issue 7052.

Survey of broken-down governments in English-speaking world

News
The Economist. Saturday, 23 December 1978.
Pages 45-48. Vol 269, issue 7060.

Contents
The Economist. Saturday, 23 December 1978.
Page 3. Vol 269, issue 7060.

Too much government 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 27 January 1979.
Pages 4,6. Vol 270, issue 7065.

Elephants can't be pink 
Survey Brazil
The Economist. Saturday, 4 August 1979.
Pages s3,s4. Vol 272, issue 7092.

The post-Confucian challenge 
News
The Economist. Saturday, 9 February 1980.
Pages 67,68. Vol 274, issue 7119.

The decade for the third shock? 
Survey Japan
The Economist. Saturday, 23 February 1980.
Pages s3,s4. Vol 274, issue 7121.

Japan 
Letters
The Economist. Saturday, 15 March 1980.
Page 6. Vol 274, issue 7124.


The Economist. Saturday, 12 April 1980.
Pages 4,5. Vol 275, issue 7128.

 +++++++++

1980 to 1989

extract from 2024/2025 report written 1984The 20th C Economist's end poverty deputy editor Norman Macrae's alternative "little sister"/ womens empowerment" future alternative to macroeconomists', big-low-trust-tech: orwells big brother -

 full book free download right hand side 

Changing education

There has been a sea-change in the traditional ages on man. Compared with 1974 our children in 2024 generally go out to paid work (especially computer programming work) much earlier, maybe starting at nine, maybe at twelve, and we do not exploit them. But young adults of twenty-three to forty-five stay at home to play much more than in 1974; it is quite usual today for one parent (probably now generally the father, although sometimes the mother) to stay at home during the period when young children are growing up. And today adults of forty-three to ninety-three go back to school - via computerised learning - much more than they did in 1974.

In most of the rich countries in 2024 children are not allowed to leave school until they pass their Preliminary Exam. About 5 per cent of American children passed their exam last year before their eight birthday, but the median age for passing it in 2024 is ten-and-a-half, and remedial education is generally needed if a child has not passed it by the age of fifteen.

A child who passes his Prelim can decide whether to tale a job at once, and take up the remainder of his twelve years of free schooling later; or he can pass on to secondary schooling forthwith, and start to study for his Higher Diploma.

The mode of learning for the under-twelves is nowadays generally computer-generated. The child sits at home or with a group of friends or (more rarely) in an actual, traditional school building. She or he will be in touch with a computer program that has discovered , during a preliminary assessment, her or his individual learning pattern. The computer will decide what next questions to ask or task to set after each response from each child.

A school teacher assessor, who may live half a world away, will generally have been hired, via the voucher system by the family for each individual child. A good assessor will probably have vouchers to monitor the progress of twenty-five individual children, although some parents prefer to employ groups of assessors - one following the child's progress in emotional balance, one in mathematics, one in civilized living, and so on - and these groups band together in telecommuting schools.

Many communities and districts also have on-the-spot 'uncles' and 'aunts'. They monitor childrens' educational performance by browsing through the TC and also run play groups where they meet and get to know the children personally...

Some of the parents who have temporarily opted out of employment to be a family educator also put up material on the TC s for other parents to consult. Sometimes the advice is given for free, sometimes as a business. It is a business for Joshua Ginsberg. He puts a parents advice newsletter on the TC , usually monthly. Over 300 million people subscribe to it, nowadays at a 5-cent fee per person, or less. Here's an entry from the current newsletter:

"Now that TCs are universal and can access libraries of books, 3-d video, computer programs, you name it, it is clear that the tasks of both the Educator and the Communicator are far more stimulating that ten years ago.

One of my recent lessons with my ten-year-old daughter Julie was in art appreciation. In the standard art appreciation course the TC shows replicas of famous artists' pictures, and a computer asks the pupil to match the artist to the picture. Julie said to the computer that it would be fun to see Constable's Haywain as Picasso might have drawn it. The computer obliged with its interpretation , and then ten more stylised haywains appeared together with the question 'who might have drawn these?'. I believe we are the first to have prompted the TC along this road, but it may now become a standard question when the computer recognises a child with similar learning patterns to Julie's.

It is sometimes said that today's isolated sort of teaching has robbed children of the capacity to play and interact with other children. This is nonsense. We ensure that Julie and her four year old brother Pharon have lots of time to play with children in our neighbourhood . But in work we do prefer to interact with children who are of mutual advantage to Julie and to each other. The computer is an ace teacher, but so are people. You really learn things if you can teach them to someone else. Our computer has helped us to find a group of four including Julie with common interests, who each have expertise in some particular areas to teach the others.

The TC also makes it easier to play games within the family. My parents used to play draughts, halma, then chess with me. They used to try to be nice to me and let me win. This condescending kindness humiliated me, and I always worked frenetically to beat my younger brother (who therefore always lost and dissolved into tears.) Today Julie, Pharon and I play halma together against the graded computer, and Julie and I play it at chess. The computer knows Pharon's standard of play at halma and Julie's and mine at chess. Its default setting is at that level where each of us can win but only if we play at our best. Thus Pharon sometimes wins his halma game while Julie and I are simultaneously losing our chess game, and this rightly gives Pharon a feeling of achievement. When Julie and I have lost at chess, we usually ask the computer to re-rerun the game, stopping at out nmistakes and giving a commentary. As it is a friendly computer it does a marvelous job of consoling us. Last week it told Julie that the world champion actually once made the same mistake as she had done - would she like to see that game?

I intend to devote the next two letters to the subjects I have discussed here , but retailing the best of your suggestions instead of droning on with mine."

While the computer's role in children's education is mainly that of instructor (discovering a child's learning pattern and responding to it) and learning group matcher, its main role in higher education is as a store of knowledge. Although a computer can only know what Man has taught it, it has this huge advantage. No individual man lives or studies long enough to imbibe within himself all the skills and resources that are the product of the millennia of man's quest for knowledge, all the riches and details from man's inheritance of learning passed on from generation to generation. But any computer today can inherit and call up instantly any skill which exists anywhere in the form of a program.

This is why automatically updated databases are today the principal instruments of higher education and academic research. It is difficult for our generation to conceive that only forty years ago our scientists acted as tortoise-like discoverers of knowledge, confined to small and jealous cliques with random and restricted methods of communicating ideas. Down until the 1980s the world has several hundred sepaate cancer research organisations with no central co-ordinating database. 

chapter 20chapter 1

chapter 2

chapter 3 part 1  chapter 3 part 2

chapter 4

chapter 5

chapter 6

chapter 7

chapter 8

chapter 9

chapter 10

chapter 11 part 1  chapter 11 part 2

chapter 12

chapter 13

chapter 14

chapter 15

chapter 16

chapter 17

chapter 18

chapter 19

 

chapter 21

Norman Macrae

follow the Ma: jack has spent since 1994 searching for where big-small chnage will come to chich markets - so fast moving consumer goods chnaged by ecommerce; finance and social sharing markets eg bikes by mobile apps-clouds; furniture by OTO;  jobs education and happiness sectors by 1 refugee and bodrer crossings, 2 expereintial learning olympics and the games of education of youth as sustainability goals generation on every belt road map

Macrae: he was an elegant writer of original ideas who delighted in paradoxes

Macrae: he was an elegant writer of original ideas who delighted in paradoxes
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In a list of 20th-century British prophets without honour in their own land, the name of Norman Macrae would surely be in the top half dozen. The lack of recognition was particularly odd as Macrae was a journalist, a profession cluttered with self-promoting egos, and his subjects — economics, politics, technology and several more — were standard fare in pubs and Parliaments. There was hardly an aspect of life that was off-limits for him; through his writing he changed many minds and opened even more; most of his ideas were ahead of their time; and he was incapable of writing a dull sentence. And yet, in Britain at least, his achievements went largely unheralded.

The contrast was not lost on Macrae — his articles delighted in paradoxes of every kind — but it was easily explained. In 1949 he joined The Economist, then as now a publication without bylines, and did not leave it until he retired in 1988. Though he went on to write several books and a column in The Sunday Times, as well as becoming an enthusiastic blogger, his finest phrases and most original ideas appeared in The Economist. He was its deputy editor from 1965-88, and though he hoped to become editor he never let frustrated ambition stunt the enormous role he played in the publication’s success. When he joined the paper in 1949, its circulation was roughly 30,000, on a par with The Spectator and the New Statesman. By the time he left, its circulation had grown to more than 300,000, dwarfing the other two. It had indeed become, in Macrae’s words, the “world’s favourite viewspaper”.

Norman Macrae was born in 1923 and went to Mill Hill School in north London. In 1935 he moved with his parents to Moscow, where his father was British Consul. The memories of Stalin’s purges, and of Hitler’s pogroms during another paternal posting, fuelled Macrae’s passionate belief in freedom — just as his experience in the RAF, as a navigator in bombing raids over Germany, later turned him against the waste of war. In 1945 he went up to Corpus Christi, Cambridge, to read economics. He was not impressed (“Much of Cambridge’s intellectual atmosphere then was of subpolytechnic Marxism”), and it was only when he arrived at The Economist that all the pieces fell into place and his life really began.

Despite its anonymity, The Economist was the perfect pulpit for Macrae. It allowed him to roam, geographically as well as intellectually, and it gave him the time to explore big ideas, many of which appeared in the paper’s surveys — the only occasion when authors had a byline.

Perhaps the most remarkable was “Consider Japan” in 1962; long before Westerners realised there might be something to learn from that defeated and hidebound nation, Macrae predicted Japan would become the world’s greatest manufacturer. One reader wrote to the editor urging that, next time Macrae went travelling, he should take a hat with him so the sun wouldn’t addle his brain.

Macrae’s articles were full of such prescience. In 1973, when oil prices quadrupled, he wrote that they would collapse — which they did, just as spectacularly, two years later. When others were extolling the settled borders of the mixed economy in the 1960s and 1970s, he was predicting a global wave of privatisation. In 1983 he forecast the Berlin Wall would come down in Christmas 1989; he was out by just six weeks. He repeatedly disputed the CIA’s analysis of the size and strength of the Soviet economy, and was in due course proved right. And in 1984 he described not just the coming of the internet but also the effects it would have on how people would work and where:

“Eventually books, files, television programmes, computer information and telecommunications will merge ... There will be cheap terminals around everywhere ... [which] will be used to access databases anywhere in the world, and will become the brainworker’s mobile place of work.”

One of the abiding temptations of futurologists is to predict what they wish for, and Macrae sometimes did just that. He had a deep distrust of politicians and officialdom, so naturally favoured a small state. Hence his words, describing a book he wrote in 1984 called The 2024 Report: “The main event of 1990-2010 was that the world’s 60-year spasm of big government disappeared. We stopped letting politicians spend the absurd 45 per cent of GNP in countries like Britain ... and we all came down to more like the 10 per cent of GNP spent through government in America in 1929.”

That was one of Macrae’s blind spots. The other was most obvious in the 1970s, when he urged the Heath Government on to bigger and bigger fiscal deficits in pursuit of faster growth and lower unemployment. It was one of the few occasions where his thinking was behind events. It took him some years to shed such crude Keynesianism and come to accept that his supply-side crusades were the surer path to faster growth.

Macrae was the most generous of colleagues, a much loved figure who in private struggled to string words into a half coherent sentence — until he picked up his pen. He was also an effective public speaker who for years delighted American audiences with his unique mix of eccentricity and brilliance. He was honoured by the Japanese with the Order of the Rising Sun in 1988. Perhaps that finally stirred the men in Whitehall, as he was appointed CBE later that year.

Macrae had a long and happy marriage to Janet Kemp, who died in 1994. They had a son and a daughter, who died in 1989 when she was 34. It needed a man of great resilience to take such blows, but nobody who knew Macrae could ever doubt that his was indeed a big heart............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Norman Macrae, CBE, journalist, was born on September 10, 1923. He died on June 11, 2010, aged 86

 

  •  ? - 
    Jun 11, 2010
     (d.)

Bio/Description

A British economist, journalist and author, considered by some to have been one of the world's best forecasters when it came to economics and society. These forecasts mapped back to system designs mediated so that readers and entrepreneurial networks could exponentially calibrate shared alternative scenarios. He joined The Economist in 1949 and retired as its deputy chief editor in 1988. He foresaw the Pacific century, the reversal of nationalization of enterprises, the fall of the Berlin Wall and the spread of the internet, which were all published in the newspaper during his time there. Not to get bored, his first ten years in retirement produced the biography of Johnny Von Neumann (the mathematical father of computers and networks), a column for the UK Sunday Times, and a 'Heresy Column' for Fortune. He was the father of mathematician, marketing commentator, and author Chris Macrae. Their joint future history on death of distance in 1984 forecast that 2005-2015 would be humanity's most critical decade irreversibly impacting sustainability. In 1984, he wrote "The 2024 Report: a future history of the next 40 years". It was the first book to: provide readers with a brainstorming journey of what people in an internetworking world might do, and predict that a new economy would emerge with revolutionary new productivity and social benefits enjoyed by all who interacted in a net-connected world. In this book, he wrote: "Eventually books, files, television programmes, computer information and telecommunications will merge. We'll have this portable object which is a television screen with first a typewriter, later a voice activator attached. Afterwards it will be miniaturised so that your personal access instrument can be carried in your buttonhole, but there will be these cheap terminals around everywhere, more widely than telephones of 1984." 
Y  chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk :: rowp.tv  :: linkedin UNwomens :: WASHINTGON DC TEXT HOTLIENE (USA=1) 240 316 8157

===============

In 1984 our family wanted to timeline little sisters maps mobilising sustainability worldwide altogether opposite to Orwell's Big Brother- download chapters from
The 2025 Report by chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk and The Economist's 20th C end poverty sub-editor Norman Macrae

Pro-youth sub-editor of The Economist, Norman Macrae 1924-2010 Japan Order Rising Sun, UK CBE, teenage world war 2 navigator over modern-day Myanmar/Bangladesh (MAP7 sustainable world trade routes)

 

 Vote for who's www.worldrecordjobs.com who?AI Trillion times moore than 60's: Emperors & royals loveQ we peoples. Mobile who's sdg action webs do child, teacher & AI coder need to app? welcome to most exciting decade - to be or not to be that is the Q?

EconomistDiary Updates 2019 #BR1Japan-Korea-Taiwan-HK;; #BR0 Inside China: @BR2 Women India Subcontinent #BR6 AI USA - #BR5 Geneva, Luxembourg, Paris, Rome

Discuss how to help world record jiob creators under 30s alumni between now and Tokyo Olympics- clickpic

down load october 2018 world record jobs creators profiles and click to 20 nations happiest futures of sustainability generation

is unctad summit oct 21 geneva sustainability trade's best ever or what?!!

norman macrae 1924-2010 obituaries -remembrance where are youth changing dreams in line with norman plac and tech surveys (download onelslide for archives) EconomistDiary.com

worldrecordjobs.pptx

14surv.pptx

breaking help us update happiest news across 13 Belt Roads to Sustainabilitywith 996 china entrepreneurs and at happy economists celebrationsof citizen exchanges

2018 welcome to 175 birthday of The Economist founded by James Wilson 1843 - we hope you will enjoy sampling valuetrue media and mapping - up to 1990 The Economist regularly surveyed peoples nations however scary their history to celebrate possible future trading win-wins of people and sustainability worldwide - we hope to see this joyful purpose of media return to BRI.school as every young person joins in asking whether their continents coastal belts and over land Roads/Grids are designed to sustain happy trades and livelihoods or the exact opposite - Little Sister Sustainability or Big Brother climate and human collapse?

These are the most exciting times to be alive - as parents decide whether to invest in youth and change children's education in time for them to help every community thrive. Where will World Record Jobs Creators turn up to celebrate millennials as the first sustainability generation- EconomistDiary.com -help search out event where leadership collaboration inspires changes to how everything is taught


14%20surveys%20on%20global%20peoples.pptx

download to one click through to every survey

update 2020...Shall we design markets for 10 billion, 3 bn or zero people?..

EconomistDiary.com-.

As people concerned by community and global media, this is our fast moving understanding of what partners in UN's great debate on sustainability goals (17 goals is a lot for one screen -more at EconomistRefugees.com) is about? we (eg 6 generations of diaspora scots mediating community health across 4 hemispheres) love to hear what you think the purpose of sustainability goals education is. rsvp isabella@unacknowledgedgiant.com

Depending what languages and faiths you use, different origins to this debate can be found. The one my scottish diaspora family knows best started 175 years ago in 1843 around James Wilson. His first concern was whether it was possible to design markets so that 2 islands - britain and ireland- grew in peace. He founded The Economist in 1843 to host what became a 17 year debate during his life time. The results were mixed  ..continued here

MAP win-win coastal BELT and continental high ROAD

41st year of celebrating return of china as central kingdom.. macrae dictionary of end poverty economics

Friends of Macrae EconomistDiary @175 

WHATS NOT POSSIBLE TO IMAGINEER AS FINTECH BANK FOR 2 BILLION POOREST BLOSSOM?

July 2018: breaking news from EconomistDiary, Norman Macrae Foundation partners with BRAC- Bangladesh's and girl empowerment's hub of WISE world's first education laureate to host futures roundtables of girls' fintech and edutech. October 1-7 sees our 3rd event following roundtables with Sir Fazle Abed and Kamal Quadir which were both kindly staged by the Japan Embassy in Dhaka, Though largely unacknowledged. dad , Norman Macrae, was awarded The Emperor's Order of the Rising Sun with Gold Bars for relentlessly arguing that essential to sustainability goals would be a return to people/family centric economics ; :Population-wise this would be led by the East especially the tenth of the world's young women living in China and Bangladesh. We aim to celebrate the recent fintech partnership between www.bkash.com of www.brac.tv and Jack Ma's Ant Finance of Alibaba -which is set to bank for empowering the poorest 2 billion on the planet. Moderating the week will be Ying Lowrey, Chinese academia's lead researcher of Ali Baba, featuring fresh news of the new global business school and all curricula celebrating SME value chain: (More on Professor Lowrey of Tsinghua.)

 (3rd week of July_) Jack Ma was just invited by the UN's Guterres to lead a new panel on digital cooperation in every market : first report march 2019 ready for 100 nation's leaders of Belt Road Imagineering (EconomistDiary April 2019 Beijing BRI 2.0 host Xi Jinping).

On Dhaka's Road to Beijing, friends of BRAC and ALIRESEARCH hope to progress edutech connections -ref why Norman Macrae's Entrepreneurial Revolution demanded a sea-change in education if sustainability is to be all parents' gift to millennials livelihoods and joy of being universally connected. chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk washington dc 240 316 8157

BELT ROAD DIGITAL COOPERATION & SDG ECONOMIC ZONES

Jack Ma and Melinda Gates report due Spring 2019 in time for sustainability's top 100 national leaders to celebrate at the second BRI.school summit to be hosted by Xi Jinping Beijing May 2019

more at EconomistDiary.com which aims to celebrate formal meeting of national leaders eg over 65 national ledaers mapping beyond colonisation's world trade routes - next beijing may 2019, tokyo olympics summer 2020 - and informal collabioations next dhaka oct 1-7, 2018 - chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

Worldwide Update for linking in peoples sustainability world trades during 1461 days of Trumpdom - see how to use map at @obamauni #TheEconomist or this linkedin group on Jack Ma's FifthEconomy 

From The Economist 1976 Coming Entrepreneurial Revolution by Norman Macrae; celebrated across Italy with Romano Prodi - where are friends  of small enterprise globalisation today? Norman died 2010- april 2017 Romano Prodi  at Beijings ThinkinChina -Norman's 3 MVPs of Entrepreneurial Revolution

Sir Fazle Abed, BRAC Bangladesh, Chief Guest at Japan Embassy celebration of Macrae 2012

Jack Ma

Muhammad Yunus, Chief Guest Norman;s last public birthday party St James, London, 2008

MAO: women lift the sky of half the world - 

welcome to 44th annual diary of elearning and jobs co-creation futures

welcome to Journalists for humanity Special Archive for 2015 UN Women EmpowerMobile Millennials sustainability

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AID DOWN THE DRAIN - The New York Times

www.nytimes.com › Books › Book Review
Feb 26, 1984 — Norman Macrae is deputy editor of The Economist of London

REALITY AND RHETORIC

Studies in the Economics of Development. By P. T. Bauer. 184 pp. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. $15.

IN Hungary in the 1920's, when Thomas Balogh and Nicholas Kaldor were learning socialist

economics at the high school attached to Budapest University, the slightly younger Peter Bauer, born in 1915, was imbibing Adam Smithism in the Skola Pia down the road. All three Budapest youths grew up to become professors of economics at Britain's senior universities, and all are now members of the House of Lords.

Lord Balogh and Lord Kaldor were principal tax and microeconomic advisers to Harold Wilson's first Labor Administration in 1964-70; the City of London wailed it was being ravaged by Magyar hordes. Lord Bauer was the first professor of economics to be ennobled by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who does not usually like professors of economics. ''Reality and Rhetoric'' is another (rather untidily updated) collection of his essays explaining how over-government stops poor countries from growing richer and why the only successful developers are the laissez-faire Singapores.

Most of his views are very unpopular with professional diplomats. He will not toady to third world governments, because his sympathy lies with their peoples, subjected to what he calls their despotism and kleptocracy. He regrets that international aid is maintaining African, Asian and Central American governments whose economic policies reduce their peoples' living standards by far more than international aid could ever raise them.


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Thus, he says, the significant figures for Tanzania, the African country that has received the most aid, are not that its foreign aid in 1980 equaled 18.1 percent of its misreported national income but that it equaled 106.8 percent of its internal tax receipts and 152.8 percent of its export earnings. The money trickling to the people was insignificant compared with the extra tax revenues and foreign exchange put at the direct disposal of the authoritarian Tanzanian Government. During the 1970's, he says, that Government used its aid to collectivize agriculture and suppress private trading activity, with devastating effects on food and other production and distribution, helping to spread famine and uproot people from their homes. Yet President Julius Nyerere is one of the more saintly third world leaders, because he does not use his aid money to finance the heroin trade and does not give to his relations the lucrative import licenses his absurd internal economic policies require.

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A similar cleanish record, except on political nepotism, is generally accorded the more democratic rulers of India, which is Asia's largest aid receiver. (In 1980, its aid equaled 1.6 percent of recorded gross national product, 16.8 percent of tax revenues and 31.2 percent of export receipts.) Yet during the 1970's, Lord Bauer points out, India used its aid to wage a war against Pakistan (another large aid recipient), build a nuclear bomb, forcibly sterilize many poor people and pursue extremely wasteful policies of import substitution and other economic controls. It also severely restricted inflows of capital, the shortage of which is the only economically logical ground for aid.

Lord Bauer does not overblame the politicans, who were serving their own self-interest in the normal way, but reserves his fury for professors of economics who have not looked at the now ample statistics of collectivism's perverse effects. His own studies show that ''commodity stabilization schemes'' do not stabilize prices but widen fluctuations in output (and probably in producers' total incomes). He also concludes that marketing boards and state cooperatives reduce the incomes of poor farmers and that computerized state planning in poor countries always has ludicrous results. Kleptocracies are the worst places in which to replace market signals by political decisions that provide more power, influence, jobs and money for civil servants, politicians and their wives. He says the culture of most of Asia and Africa has always been more authoritarian than the West's - thus less conducive to self-reliance, sustained curiosity and experiment - so it is wicked for Western economists to help extend the period of overgovernment that reinforces this disadvantage.

Free marketers who are more optimistic about third world development, including myself, believe that institutional aid should be continued through the International Monetary Fund and other lending agencies but be geared to the requirement that recipients end economic nonsenses. There is obviously no kindness in pumping more government-to- government aid money into countries whose main problems are inflation (stemming from excessive money supply), autocracy and overgovernment. But there does seem a case for not allowing balance-of-payments restraints to dictate excess restrictions in poor countries where a new entrepreneurism is struggling to breathe free. Lord Bauer opposes this view because he thinks that entrepreneurs who use cheap labor and whose activities appear to be profitable will generally get all of the rather little capital they need anyway.

Those who dispute this part of Lord Bauer's generally convincing judgment should read this book, but they may be deterred because the distinquished economist gets cross in such detail with discredited leftist academics of the 1950's and '60s. The eagle should not hunt flies.B

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BRI.school ENTREPRENEURIAL REVOLUTION NETWORK BENCHMARKS 2025now : Remembering Norman Macrae

how do humans design futures?-in the 2020s decade of the sdgs – this question has never had moore urgency. to be or not t be/ – ref to lessons of deming or keynes, or glasgow university alumni smith and 200 years of hi-trust economics mapmaking later fazle aded - we now know how-a man made system is defined by one goal uniting generations- a system multiplies connected peoples work and demands either accelerating progress to its goal or collapsing - sir fazle abed died dec 2020 - so who are his modt active scholars networks empowering youth with his knohow n- soros with jim kim paul farmer leon botstein and with particular contexts- girls village development and with ba-ki moon global climate adaptability where cop26 november will be a great chance to renuite with 260 years of adam smith and james watts purposes there is no point in connecting with system mentors unless you want to end poverty-specifically we interpret sdg 1 as meaning mext girl or boy born has fair chance at free happy an productive life as we seek to make any community a child is born into a thriving space to grow up between discover of new worlds in 1500 and 1945 systems got worse and worse on the goal eg processes like slavery emerged- and ultimately the world was designed around a handful of big empires and often only the most powerful men in those empires. 4 amazing human-tech systems were invented to start massive use by 1960 borlaug agriculture and related solutions every poorest village (2/3people still had no access to electricity) could action learn person to person- deming engineering whose goal was zero defects by helping workers humanize machines- this could even allowed thousands of small suppliers to be best at one part in machines assembled from all those parts) – although americans invented these solution asia most needed them and joyfully became world class at them- up to 2 billion people were helped to end poverty through sharing this knowhow- unlike consuming up things actionable knowhow multiplies value in use when it links through every community that needs it the other two technologies space and media and satellite telecoms, and digital analytic power looked promising- by 1965 alumni of moore promised to multiply 100 fold efficiency of these core tech each decade to 2030- that would be a trillion tmes moore than was needed to land on the moon in 1960s. you might think this tech could improve race to end poverty- and initially it did but by 1990 it was designed around the long term goal of making 10 men richer than 40% poorest- these men also got involved in complex vested interests so that the vast majority of politicians in brussels and dc backed the big get bigger - often they used fake media to hide what they were doing to climate and other stuff that a world trebling in population size d\from 1945 to 2030 also needed to map. so the good and bad news is we the people need to reapply all techs where they are only serving rich men and politicians od every party who have taken us to the brink of ending our species- these are the most exciting times to be alive - we the 3 generations children parents grandparents have until 2030 to design new system orbits gravitated around goal 1 and navigating the un's other 17 goals do you want to help/ 8 cities we spend most time helping students exchange sustainability solutions 2018-2019 BR0 Beijing Hangzhou: BR6 Geneva, Luxembourg, BR2 Dhaka, Delhi, BR1 Tokyo, Seoul

Map with Belt Road Imagineers :where do you want to partner in sustaining world

Our search for top 50 World Record Jobs Creators begins with E1 Xi Jinping - World's Number 1 Job Creator - Peoples Global2.0 

Girls world maps begin at B01 Bangladesh economical miracle of 15 million poorest village mothers grasssroots networking -good news reporting with fazleabed.com brac.tv and valuetrue.com and womenuni.com

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online library of norman macrae--

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correspondence welcomed on 50 year curriculum of Entrepreneurial Revolution and net generation as most productive time to be alive - chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

MA1 AliBaba TaoBao

Ma 2 Ali Financial

Ma10.1 DT and ODPS

health catalogue; energy catalogue

Keynes: 2025now - jobs Creating Gen

.

how poorest women in world build

A01 BRAC health system,

A02 BRAC education system,

A03 BRAC banking system

K01 Twin Health System - Haiti& Boston

K02 Twin YouthWorldBanking: Haiti& Bkash (BRAC)

K03 Twin Open Society : Budapest-Rome - Economists and Peace Champions

A04 Africa & Asia's 5 Billion Peoples eleraning satellite Yazmi

A05 Triplet Open Apps Media Labs of Ethiopia and MIT and Ma-Lee (worldwide China)

Job creation case Y01 Foundation of Grameen Bank- good news in association with grameen.tv
Ma 10,2 grameen inteldt

Ma 10.3 IHUB/Usha Kenya DT

Ma 10.4 Kenya nanocredit

Ma 10.5 MIT top ten mobile app labs of open tech

Ma 10.6 berners lee www

KMAS1 Kimchoices KMAS1.1 Ki-Moon KMAS1.2 Sun F Yang Lan

W4E1 telecentres for girls jobs

W4E2 womens nanocredit

KHANac

BRACAbed,

CEUSoros

,SABlecher

MITtbl

NOBATYunus

LUCKNOWGandhi

ChinaMa

NZDryden

MEDIALABNegropronte > Yazmi

COURSEraKoller >OLC

AFM00 Samara and AfricaStar and Yazmi
AFM10 IHUB/Ushahidi
AFM11 MIT Media Lab Africa
AFM12 MIT D-lab and Abdul Latif with Toyota
AFM121 Polak last mile multinationals africa –eg green energy and clean water distrib
AFM13 Ibrahim Foundation
AFM14 Africa24tv
TB1 Free University and Jobs Schools
TB11 Open Learning Campus Africa
AFM15 Young Africa Society –world bank ypa milennials’ goals 2.1
AFM2 Jamii Bora –end slums youth banking and partner labs
TB20 Primary financial literacy curriculum – eg Afaatoun out of Orphanages
AFM21 Bridges primary schools
TB21 Love of self- empowerment curriculum – eg Maharishi (TB1)
TB22 Coding curricula from primary up
AFM31 Kiva Africa
AFM32 Acumen
AFM33 BRAC African Girl Jobs-creating banking
AFM34 Eagri-Africa
AFM35 African health millennials www –and PIH Rwanda, Free Nursing College Africa
AFM36 Mara Foundation
AFM4 MPESA/Safari
AFM5 Nanocredit
AFM6 USADBC - diaspora association benchmarking african food security value chains
AFM61 –diaspora multi-country celebrations eg AfricaTip (AgeTip)
AFM611 NEPAD
AFM612 Makerfaireafrica
BOM1 berners lee
BOM2 mit every students an entrepreneur
BOM21 MIT100k
BOM3 mit media lab -open source wizard entrepreneurs and new commons
BOM30 Negroponte $100 Laptop
BOM31 Joi Ito
BOM32 reclaim our learning
BOM4 MIT open education movement
BIM41 OLA
BOM5 Legatum
BO51 Legatum millennials and fans
BOM52 networks of cashless banking technolgists
BOM53 innovations journal
BOM6 partners in health/brigham womens hospital
BOM61 value chain networks club inspired by pih and world bank millenials
BOM62 ypchronic
BOM63 GFH
BOM64 Haiti training hospital - connector of neraly free nursing college
BOSF1 Kiva and puddle
BOSF2 Khan Academy
BOSF3 Coursera segment interested in Open Learning Campus

communications and community banking links series 1 and 2

Out of The Economist since 1972 Macrae's viewpoint Entrepreneurial Revolution argues that the net generation can make tremendous human progress if and only if educators, economists and all who make the biggest resource integrate youth job creating into the way their worldwide purpose and impact is valued -chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk join in ... 43rd Entrepreneurial Revolution Youth Networks Celebration..
 


job creation survey

discuss valuation video

Norman Macrae Foundation

e chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

Wash DC tel 1 301 881 1655

 

 

 

For how many of The Economist's first 175 years was it the most effective mediator of sustainability exponentials of humanity all over the planet

 

best million-youth moocs hosted by economists

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discuss valuation video

hottest youth-spring question of our life and times-can online education end youth unemployment for ever ? yes but only if you help map how!

moocyunus launches youtube competition -what would purpose of youth's favorite free online university be?

join blog of moocyunus

 

 The Economist- when first seeing youth experiment with digital networks in 1972,

Season's most urgent collaboration debates:

next 100 million jobs nursing

42nd year of 7 wonders if thinkpad of The Economist's genre of Entrepreneurial Revoution

40 years of notes from archives of entrepreneurial revolution 1-7 a...

 

help catalogue top 100 microfranchises

 

help catalogue 100 short videos on right old muddle of anti-youth economists..

Dad (Norman Macrae) created the genre Entrepreneurial Revolution  to debate how to make the net generation the most productive and collaborative . We had first participated in computer assisted learning experiments in 1972. Welcome to more than 40 years of linking pro-youth economics networks- debating can the internet be the smartest media our species has ever collaborated around?

Foundation Norman Macrae- The Economist's Pro-Youth Economist

5801 Nicholson Lane Suite 404 Rockville MD 20852   tel 301 881 1655 email chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

Main Project webs wholeplanet.tv

microeducationsummit.com including yunusdiary.com bracnet.ning.com taddyblecher.com as lead open education partner of mandela elders and branson 

NormanMacrae.ning.com

2013 = 170th Year of The Economist being Founded to End Hunger

2010s = Worldwide Youth's most productive and collaborative decade

 1972: Norman Macrae starts up Entrepreneurial Revolution debates in The Economist. Will we the peoples be in time to change 20th C largest system designs and make 2010s worldwide youth's most productive time? or will we go global in a way that ends sustainability of ever more villages/communities? Drayton was inspired by this genre to coin social entrepreneur in 1978 ,,continue the futures debate here

world favorite moocs-40th annual top 10 league table

  • 1) e-ME
  • 2) 8 week tour of grameen curriculum and uniting human race to poverty museums
  • 3) 8 week tour of brac curriculum and mapping microeducation summit for post 2015 milennium goals

send votes to chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk , Macrae Foundation

  • 4) 8 week tour of africa's free university and entrepreneurial slums
  • 5 what to do now for green energy to save the world in time
  • 6 nurses as 21st world's favorite information grassroots networkers and most economical cheerleaders more

 

 

  • 7 how food security as a mising curricululum of middle schools can co-create more jobs than any nation can dream of
  • 8 pro-youth economics and public servants
  • 9 celebrating china as number 1 creditor nation
  • 10 questions worldwide youth are asking about what was true last decade but false this decade because that's what living in the most innovative era means chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

archives at The Economist



 

Number 1 in Economics for Youth

The unacknowledged giantcelebrate unacknowledged giant

dannyboyle chrispatten butler-sloss marianowak tomhunter MYunusgeorgesoros bernerslee michael palin

Timeless ER from The Economist's Unacknowledged Giant (aka dad Norman Macrae) A  b  c ;;1997 a;;; 1983 a ;;;1976 a b;;; 1972 a ;;; 1962 a 1956 a - correspndence with optimistic rationalists always welcome - chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

 

from chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk please help in 2 ways -nomination of collaboration 100; testify to world's largest public broadcasters such as BBCthat this survey needs their mediation now

Intercapital searches for replicable youth eonomic franchise

.Japan

Bangladesh

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Atlanta.
Paris
Turkey.
Dhaka.
Austria
Boston
Brussels Poland
China
Switzerland
Princeton-Nashville
London-Glasgow Nordica: S D N
Canada
Austin
Spain .Kenya
Brazil Joburg
Oregon/CA
Germany
.S.Africa
.India

 

 

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