help microeducate and microfranchise 3 billion jobs

Norman Macrae Youth Foundation NMYF -net of The Economist's pro-youth economist

mapping what open education can be searched through skoll and ...

they report by these practice are

 

some  thoughts from discussions around yunus and youth:

1 yunus believes forestry could be a huge social business - one region he is advancing that in is Haiti

4 grameen has just published the grameen nursing college curriculum - this could be world changing as it is arguably the first curriculum every published by a real university service that aims to be as nearly free as possible; cf with online curriculum which start from being free!

7 it has been projected that bangladesh will be first 100 million nation to be drowned by climate change if we don't launch enough green energy 1 in time - naturally this makes friends of yunus world leaders in mapping green energy microfranchises

8 sanitation is a change world leadership practice led by yunus friinds in singpaore - see jack sim www.worldtoilet.org   - jack hosted the first singapore social business week in 2012 with university partner national uni of Singapore which is also a coursera parter

 

 

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streaming thursday  11 april 17.30 Uk time http://skollworldforum.org/forum-2013/live/?utm_source=Skoll+World+...
Jeff Skoll, Founder, Skoll Foundation, Skoll Global Threats Fund, Participant Media

HONORARY SKOLL AWARD FOR SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Annie Lennox, Founder, The SING Campaign

2013 SKOLL AWARDS FOR SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Carne Ross, Independent Diplomat Ross's ID net -grand father AR
Gemma Mortensen, Crisis Action
Gopi Gopalakrishnan, World Health Partners helping doctors franchise telemedicine 1 2

Chris Underhill, BasicNeeds
Mushtaq K. Chhapra, The Citizens Foundation
Salman Amin Khan, Khan Academy

GLOBAL TREASURE AWARD
Muhammad Yunus, Founder, Grameen Bank

MUSICAL PERFORMANCES
Festival in Exile
Monica Yunus

http://www.skollfoundation.org/issue/education-and-economic-opportu...

skoll's list is as follows - in bold education revolutions we at www.microeducationsummit.com  know can scale - mail us chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk  if you know one we dont't

Education and Economic Opportunity

Opportunity – for education, jobs, income, raising a family – divides those with a promising future from those without. Adequate preparation and access to education and employment opportunities make a rise out of extreme poverty possible. So does honing personal skills to enable professional advancement and unlock job opportunities. We advance innovations that enhance a person’s ability to improve her/his economic well-being and personal dignity. Regions include: Africa, Asia, Latin America, Middle East, United States.


PROVIDING EDUCATIONAL AND ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES:

Aflatoun promotes a culture of saving, builds money skills and develops responsibility, reaching more than 540,000 children in about 5,000 schools in 32 countries worldwide.

Arzu pays women weavers above-market compensation for handwoven rugs and provides literacy, education and health benefits. Its rugs are sold on www.arzustudiohope.org. Arzu reconstructed the carpet supply chain to accommodate custom and contract orders, leading to a 44% growth in sales.

Barefoot College educates poor Indians (mostly women) through peer-to-peer learning and is transformational in that it relies on the passing on of traditional skills and knowledge. Locals are trained as doctors, teachers, engineers, architects, designers, mechanics, communicators and accountants and they use technology in innovative ways: mobile phones are set to work monitoring water quality through an online dataset, solar-powered cookers are constructed to break dependence on wood.

Benetech is a nonprofit technology company based in Palo Alto, California. Benetech pursues projects with a strong social rather than financial rate of return on investment, harnessing open source technology to create solutions to social issues. The Benetech Bookshareservice is the world’s largest accessible online library of copyrighted books for people with print disabilities such as blindness.

Camfed fights poverty and AIDS in Africa by educating girls and empowering young women. It packages scholarships, community support, and mentor networks to help girls succeed in school and prepare for jobs. More than 1.4 million have benefited from Camfed’s holistic intervention from elementary school to adulthood.

Change through Digital Inclusion (CDI) sets up computer labs and offers training in everything from basic computer services to IT skills. CDI has built more than 800 community centers in thirteen countries giving more than 1.3 million people access to the Web, the bulk in Brazil and many for the first time. CDI maintains computers that would otherwise be discarded by companies making upgrades, and supports use of the equipment in community development projects.

INJAZ Al-Arab is the only significant educational program in the Middle East focused on empowering young people by bringing leaders from the private sector into the classroom to teach entrepreneurship, work and life skills. It reaches 68,000 students a year in 13 Arab countries.

The Afghan Institute for Learning (AIL) provides education to 235,000 Afghan women and children and has impacted 7 million Afghans through teacher training and workshops on human rights, women’s rights, peace, and leadership.

The Citizens Foundation (TCF) provides affordable primary and secondary private education to low-income students in Pakistan’s urban slums and rural areas, with a focus on girls. Its model enables it to navigate Pakistan’s unique cultural environment and country constraints, allowing it to be more effective in attracting and retaining female students. Its model includes robust teacher and principal training, all of whom are female to appease parents; building safe schools close to students’ homes; fees relative to a family’s income and small class sizes limited to no more than 30 students (other schools can have as many as 100). TCF gains family buy-in, transforming often illiterate parents into believers in education.  TCF serves 115,000 students, has 5,800 all-female teachers and principals, and a 50% female student body, compared to 15-20% in TCF communities. It has a 92% pass rate at matriculation level, versus the national average of 56%.

Citizen Schools transforms American after-school programs from an afterthought to part of large-scale education reform. Their program for low-income middle school students entails hands-on learning staffed by volunteer Citizen Teachers.

Civic Ventures develops ways for baby boomers to remain engaged in society through paving the path for the encore career. As people live longer, Civic Ventures provides tools for older generations to remain engaged and give back to society through meaningful work that uses their talents and experience.

College Summit helps students complete their college applications and develop a college list, producing a 20 percent increase in college enrollment for participants.

Community and Individual Development Association, or CIDA, created CIDA City Campus, South Africa’s first free university. They have provided education to more than 5,000 students who could not afford it otherwise.

Digital Divide Data’s global partnership between its Western business arm and its high-touch Southeast Asian social service program creates a unique and scalable fair trade model for development across industries. They have graduated 400 people in Cambodia and Laos to high-skilled jobs in which they make more than 4 times the average regional wage. Their business is sustainable, generating over $3 million in revenue last fiscal year while realizing efficiency gains.

Escuela NuevaNew School” gives children in rural areas learning materials using curricula they developed themselves. Adopted by Colombia’s Ministry of Education and duplicated in 16 countries, in 2009 they provided 87,000 low-income children in Colombia with learning materials, covering 30 percent of the rural primary student population.

Free The Children (FTC) provides educational opportunities to children around the world, thus freeing them to pursue their dreams and bring about positive social change. They organize volunteer service trips to Asia, Africa and Central America and built more than 500 schools in those areas.

Friends-International helps prevent child abuse. Its model has been established or replicated in 12 countries. It has two key programs: ChildSafe, which involves local leaders and tourists in prevention, and The Street Children Network, which makes services available to street children.

Fundación Paraguaya gives microcredit and entrepreneurship education to thousands of small businesses. It became a leader in microenterprise development as Paraguay transitioned to democracy and developed a self-sustaining, productive agricultural school that offers credit upon graduation.

Gawad Kalinga transforms slums into peaceful and productive communities. It works with 2,000 communities in the Philippines and other nations where poverty exists including Cambodia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Engaging all sectors of society, mobilizing them to work together to end poverty, the organization is building a global army of volunteers on the ground and online, working with schools, corporations and other organized institutions to mainstream a culture of caring and sharing. Gawad Kalinga means to “give care”.

GoodWeave eliminates the exploitation of bonded child laborers in carpet manufacturing. In Nepal, Pakistan and India, the organization monitors factories, certifies carpets made without bonded labor and rescues and educates child laborers. 9,000 children have attended school under GoodWeave sponsorship.

Half the Sky (HTS) is challenging the institutionalized inefficiency of state-run orphanages in China. They convinced the government to exclusively partner with them and implement HTS models throughout the country.

Institute for Development Studies and Practices (IDSP) Pakistan allows students to become engaged in the social and economic development of their country by providing schools that impart skills for community leadership. So far, 1,200 people graduated from six different types of practice-based courses. Twelve ISDP Senior Fellows (six are women), who had no development experience, have worked on development projects ranging in size up to $1.3 million.

Kashf Foundation stands out from other microfinance institutions because of its offerings that empower women. Kashf is the first microfinance (MFI) to achieve financial sustainability in Pakistan; it’s the third largest MFI in the country, with 288,000 clients through 150+ branches. Kashf has a pioneering life insurance product and Forbes named Kashf a Top 50 Global Microfinance Institution in 2007.

Khan Academy strives to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere – through online content delivered directly to independent learners worldwide or using a blended learning model in schools. It allows a student to learn at her own pace to truly master a subject. Khan Academy is removing the 60-minute lecture and “humanizing the classroom”. Students can now view short video lectures when needed, and the teacher can focus their time on facilitating small group instruction, one-on-one sessions, peer-to-peer tutoring, and project-based learning. The Academy has amassed more than 3,600 video tutorials, exercises, performance dashboards, and incentive badges. Its multi-partner distribution strategy includes: direct to learners via the Internet, school partnerships, teacher toolkits, and internationalization efforts. In 2012, they grew from 1 million users per month to 6 million+ users per month. Khan Academy’s videos have been viewed more than 200 million times, and 700+ million exercises have been completed.

Kiva is a pioneer of Internet microfinance. Kiva has roughly 700,000 registered users who have lent around $120 million in four years, spreading the cause of microfinance and empowerment to the mass market.

Manchester Bidwell Corporation (MBC) is a vocational training program with art and recording studios, computer classrooms, a music hall and an industrial kitchen. MBC’s youth programs connect arts knowledge and skills with academic standards, citizenship and life disciplines. It also has career education.

New Teacher Center has refined a model to pair veteran teachers with talented and inexperienced new teachers, launching New Teacher Center in 1998. In 2010, the center reached more than 26,000 teachers to affect 1.84 million students. To bolster its impact, the Center plays an active role in the National Education Policy debate, advocating for state and federal policies.

Nidan champions informal workers in India’s north and east, who proudly call it their own organization. The country’s informal sector makes up  93 percent of the workforce, creating 64 percent of GDP. Nidan organizes these workers, incubates sector-based collectives and partners with government to demonstrate that models of rights-based, inclusive growth can work. It advocates, too, from local governance to state and national level governance structures and policy institutions. Nidan means “solutions” in Hindi.

Population and Community Development Association helped stop rapid population growth in Thailand, and teaches HIV/AIDS. It also gives micro-credit loans. PDA’s approach to reproductive health over 35 years resulted in Thailand’s population growth rate declining from 3.2 percent in 1974 to 0.5 percent in 2005, and, according to a World Bank study, an estimated 7.7 million lives were saved as a result of PDA’s HIV prevention campaigns.

Pratham provides quality education for underprivileged elementary school age children in India. Its programs focus on urban areas to increase the enrollment and learning levels of children living in urban slums.

Room to Read is a global organization focusing on literacy and gender equality in education in the developing world. Room to Read helps develop literacy skills and a habit of reading among primary school children and ensures girls have the skills and support needed to complete their secondary education. Since 2000, Room to Read has impacted the lives of more than four million children in Asia and Africa and aims to reach 10 million children by 2015.

Sonidos de la TierraSounds of the Land” inspires kids through music and engages entire communities to support performances, reaching more than 12,000 children from Central and South America.

Teach For All aims to eliminate educational inequality by leveraging promising future leaders to teach in public school classrooms, providing children with committed, energetic teachers and creating lifelong advocates among alumni for high-quality public education. Teach For America attracted more than 35,000 talented graduates for 4,100 teaching slots.

Tostan has helped abandon the practice of female genital cutting (FGC) and child marriages in five African countries. It has taught human rights to more than 200,000 villagers. Tostan’s approach has been integrated into international strategies, including 10 U.N. agencies and 5 governments. In Senegal, the government has adopted a National Action Plan that calls for using the human rights approach pioneered by Tostan to end FGC by 2015.

Visayan Forum Foundation empowers trafficked women and girls in the Philippines and works for decent domestic work. Its integrated approach to intercepting the women, then supporting them, includes partnerships with law enforcement, source communities, transit authorities and transportation companies. Its Step Up program teaches life skills, entrepreneurship and IT skills to victims of trafficking. About a third of its graduates now have good jobs and a third are furthering their education.

YouthBuild USA teaches at-risk young people to construct homes and offers at-risk youth leadership training, education and skills that lead to good jobs. It’s helped change national policy: its principle that low-income youth should be included as service givers in American national service programs is now standard. It’s affected the international landscape, with more than 10 countries now hosting YouthBuild.

===================================================

strange omissions

grameen nursing college

www.brac.net

www.cmseducation.org

www.thelearningweb.net

coursera and edx

hole in the wall http://www.hole-in-the-wall.com/ Sugata Mitra

from http://www.onlineuniversities.com/blog/2013/03/edtech-third-world-d...

EdTech in the Third World: Distance Learning


by

In this series on ed tech in the third world, we’ve explored the growth of online and mobile access for third world students, as well as great educational technology tools that connect students to learning. These are excellent advancements for education in developing countries, but there’s another important part of third world ed tech that we haven’t explored yet: distance learning resources.

Distance learning resources, including massive open online courses (MOOCs), open textbooks, and mobile learning tools, bring first-world education to the third world at a very accessible price: free. With available connections and the tools necessary to use them, distance learning can bring quality education within the reach of every student in the world.

The Growth of Distance Learning

Distance learning is experiencing new excitement and possibilities with the growth of online learning, but many developing communities have been using distance learning for a long time. Students in rural China are likely to be familiar with the China Agricultural Radio and TV School, developed over 20 years to become the world’s largest distance learning resource for rural areas using radio, TV, satellite, and audio visual materials. And India launched an educational satellite in 2004 with the exclusive purpose of sharing educational resources with rural students in developing communities. But with the development of thousands of free learning resources, often at the university level, there’s so much available now that goes beyond what developing communities are able to provide on their own.

University Learning Resources

Students who may not have access to great schools in their local area can still reach world-class education. Free distance learning courses, including open courseware (OCW) and MOOCs allow students in the far reaches of the world to study materials created by the likes of MIT, Harvard, and Yale. Some even offer certificates for work completed, making these distance education resources excellent career boosters for third-world students.

OCW unlocks knowledge from some of the world’s best universities. These schools open their course materials, from lectures to reading materials, online for learners to access for free. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is the largest and most widely regarded open course project, with more than 2,000 individual courses available. Johns Hopkins School of Public Health‘s open courseware is particularly useful in the third world, with public health courses in topics that are of special interest to developing communities, including malariology, infant mortality, and water sanitation. Students can use the information they’ve learned from these open education resources to solve problems in their communities, and even better understand course materials they’re taught in local schools.

Similar to OCW, MOOCs are the next generation of online learning. These resources take open courses a step further, allowing students to follow along in an organized group and discuss and interact with professors and other students. Providers including EdX, Udacity, and Coursera work with the world’s best universities to publish and administer courses, which typically take place over the course of several weeks. Once students have completed the course, they’ll typically receive a certificate of their work.

Students in the developing world have already caught on to the great value in these educational resources, including young female learners in Pakistan. Khadija Niazi of Pakistan uses Udacity to explore her potential as a physicist. The 12-year-old Niazi’s MOOC studies have enabled her to propel her life and influence to new heights, as one of the youngest speakers at the recent World Economic Forum in Davos. Niazi, as well as her twin brother have earned certificates for their online studies and plan to continue pursuing free online education.

OCW and MOOC providers have already established themselves as excellent learning resources that can serve the entire world, but they’re working diligently to expand their reach even further. There’s a bright future ahead for open courses, and many providers have set their sights on better reaching learners in the developing world. MIT has a goal to reach a billion minds by 2021, bridging the gap between potential and opportunity for learners around the world. They’re working to make OCW more flexible for use in developing communities with tools like mobile phones, and customizing OCW to meet the needs of a variety of cultures and backgrounds. MOOC provider Coursera is currently working to expand into more worldwide languages, especially French, which will allow 96 million French speaking learners in Europe, China, and Africa to take their courses.

Distance Learning Resources

In addition to university course projects, there are a variety of distance learning resources that are working to reach the third world. Websites that offer free lectures or learning videos, share learning resources, and publish open textbooks make education available to everyone in the world.

The Khan Academy boasts over 4,000 different videos covering topics from elementary math to science, history, and the humanities. This project was created by Salman Khan, who started the academy with a mission to create a free virtual school .... "I see a world where literally anyone with access to a computer and the internet will be able to go to the Khan Academy," Khan says. He expects that within the next decade, technology and bandwidth will be cheap and advanced enough to educate third world countries for free with Khan Academy learning materials. For students who struggle with online connections, KA Lite offline desktop software is available.

In addition to online schools like Khan Academy, educational lecture collections offer third world students access to the world’s greatest thinkers. YouTube EDU shares educational videos, from academic lectures to inspiring speeches. Learners can find primary and secondary school resources, as well as university level learning. And through TED, students can watch speeches from some of the greatest speakers in the world, exploring talks that inform and stir curiosity.

But it’s not just video learning that’s available to third world students online. There are a variety of textbook projects open to developing communities as well. Textbooks are often out of reach for students in the third world, but free online texts make them available. The University of Georgia’s Global Text Project publishes electronic texts for the exclusive use of the developing world, partnering with authors to provide an electronic version of books. Many of them are translated into different languages, including Chinese and Spanish. Other projects that make textbooks available online for free include Wikibooks, The Open Textbook Challenge, and the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources.

Mobile Learning Resources

Mobile learning makes educational resources more accessible, delivering OCW, MOOCs, distance learning, and open textbooks to the hands of learners in the developing world. Online educational resources and open textbooks are useful to third world students, but only if they can reach them. Only 20% of homes in the developing world have a computer with Internet access, but 90% of the world has access to a cellular connection of 2G or greater speeds. Four out of every five worldwide mobile connections are in poor countries, making it possible for students around the world to engage in mobile learning opportunities.

Previously discussed Worldreader, an organization with a push to share e-readers with the developing world, has also collaborated on software that can display ebooks on nearly any cell phone in the world. Partnering with app developer biNu, Worldreader’s library of thousands of books has currently reached 4.5 million phones. The organization hopes to reach 10 million by the end of 2013. The books featured in Worldreader Mobile’s library include texts of local interest, like Nigerian short stories and life-saving information on malaria and HIV/AIDS.

The Taliban has prevented many Afghan women from attending school, banning schooling for girls during their rule that ended in 2001. So many women missed out on education during this period that Afghanistan’s literacy rate among women is only 12.5%. But a mobile learning program, Ustad Mobile (Mobile Teacher) is working to bring literacy to Afghanistan’s women. In addition to national curriculum language courses, Ustad Mobile provides learners with lessons in math. Lessons are delivered to Ustad Mobile phones, offering audio-video learning resources to women who were unable to go to school under Taliban rule.

Mobile video startup Vuclip is in a unique position to share educational videos with the developing world. More than 25 million video views are served to consumers worldwide each day by Vuclip, and they’ve recently added educational videos to the mix as well. These videos are specifically optimized for the mobile experience, and will automatically adjust to the resolution and features available on the user’s network and device. This makes it easier for learners on low-end devices with poor connections to utilize the videos. Featuring videos from Khan Academy and MIT Open Courseware, Vuclip’s EDU video offerings are very useful for third world learners.

How You Can Help

Distance learning content for the third world takes many forms, and in this developing segment, there are many ways to contribute. Schools can provide distance learning resources, authors can share their works, individuals can donate time and talent, and anyone can provide financial support.

  • Consider offering a MOOC or OCW. Professors and universities can share educational resources and discussion opportunities with students in the third world by creating a MOOC. Often, these courses are created from existing lectures and course materials in partnership with MOOC providers including EdX, Coursera, and Udacity.
  • Create educational content online. If you have a teaching background, or are knowledgeable in a particular subject, add your expertise to existing educational content projects. Contribute to YouTube EDU, and you can share what you know with the world.
  • Volunteer for translation projects. Most of the educational content available online is in English, but many worldwide learners do not understand the language. Contribute to the TED Open Translation Project or Khan Academy to create translated subtitles or dubbed videos, so that learners worldwide can interact with these learning materials. Global Text Project is also in need of translators, and is currently seeking crowdsourced Spanish translation for their books.
  • Give your services in other ways. Khan Academy Lite needs help in many ways, from development to testing, and even seeding torrents for download. Wikibooks needs book contributors of all levels, as well as editors. Published authors can share their works with Worldreader.
  • Offer your financial support. Find a few extra dollars to give from your paycheck, or give in more creative ways. Find out if your company offers donation matching, offer your services for fundraising, host a bake sale for Worldreader, encourage your company to sponsor OCW, or shop with educational organizations. MIT OCW has an Amazon.com store, as well as one on Zazzle. You can pick up Khan Academy gear in their shop as well.

Distance education has the power to change lives in the third world. It holds the potential to spread life-changing, and life-saving, information to learners around the world, even in developing communities. In an interview with MIT professor and passionate open educator Walter Lewin, he shared his vision for distance learning in the developing world:

"My goal is to educate the world. My dream is to reach out to one billion people on a time scale of about 10 years, and that all of the good universities in the United States, in Europe, in Japan, in India, that all of them will reach out to the world and give people an opportunity to, effectively, a free education. That will have a huge impact on the world. You’re not talking about teaching a million people, you’re not talking about teaching 100 million people, you’re talking about a billion. In principle, we can educate a billion people."

With the world’s knowledge at their hands, learners in the third world can create better lives for their families, and contribute to their communities. This is what distance learning does, and it’s spreading.

A University for the 21 Century

Tomorrow’s University Will Be …

A number of forces are changing the world and the education you need to succeed in it. Is your university ready for the 21st century?

View timeline of tomorrow's university

Pratham Madhav Chavan

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ENTREPRENEURIAL REVOLUTION NETWORK BENCHMARKS 2025now : Remembering Norman Macrae

health catalogue; energy catalogue

Keynes: 2025now - jobs Creating Gen

how poorest women in world build

A01 BRAC health system,

A02 BRAC education system,

A03 BRAC banking system

K01 Twin Health System - Haiti& Boston

K02 Twin YouthWorldBanking: Haiti& Bkash (BRAC)

K03 Twin Open Society : Budapest-Rome - Economists and Peace Champions

A04 Africa & Asia's 5 Billion Peoples eleraning satellite Yazmi

A05 Triplet Open Apps Media Labs of Ethiopia and MIT and Ma-Lee (worldwide China)

Job creation case Y01 Foundation of Grameen Bank- good news in association with grameen.tv

B01 Bangladesh economical miracle of 15 million poorest village mothers grasssroots networking -good news reporting with brac.tv and valuetrue.com and womenuni.com

.

online library of norman macrae--correspondence welcomed on 42 year curriculum of Entrepreneurial Revolution and net generation as most productive time to be alive - chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

MA1 AliBaba TaoBao

Ma 2 Ali Financial

Ma10.1 DT and ODPS
Ma 10,2 grameen inteldt

Ma 10.3 IHUB/Usha Kenya DT

Ma 10.4 Kenya nanocredit

Ma 10.5 MIT top ten mobile app labs of open tech

Ma 10.6 berners lee www

KMAS1 Kimchoices KMAS1.1 Ki-Moon KMAS1.2 Sun F Yang Lan

W4E1 telecentres for girls jobs

W4E2 womens nanocredit

KHANac

BRACAbed,

CEUSoros

,SABlecher

MITtbl

NOBATYunus

LUCKNOWGandhi

ChinaMa

NZDryden

MEDIALABNegropronte > Yazmi

COURSEraKoller >OLC

AFM00 Samara and AfricaStar and Yazmi
AFM10 IHUB/Ushahidi
AFM11 MIT Media Lab Africa
AFM12 MIT D-lab and Abdul Latif with Toyota
AFM121 Polak last mile multinationals africa –eg green energy and clean water distrib
AFM13 Ibrahim Foundation
AFM14 Africa24tv
TB1 Free University and Jobs Schools
TB11 Open Learning Campus Africa
AFM15 Young Africa Society –world bank ypa milennials’ goals 2.1
AFM2 Jamii Bora –end slums youth banking and partner labs
TB20 Primary financial literacy curriculum – eg Afaatoun out of Orphanages
AFM21 Bridges primary schools
TB21 Love of self- empowerment curriculum – eg Maharishi (TB1)
TB22 Coding curricula from primary up
AFM31 Kiva Africa
AFM32 Acumen
AFM33 BRAC African Girl Jobs-creating banking
AFM34 Eagri-Africa
AFM35 African health millennials www –and PIH Rwanda, Free Nursing College Africa
AFM36 Mara Foundation
AFM4 MPESA/Safari
AFM5 Nanocredit
AFM6 USADBC - diaspora association benchmarking african food security value chains
AFM61 –diaspora multi-country celebrations eg AfricaTip (AgeTip)
AFM611 NEPAD
AFM612 Makerfaireafrica
BOM1 berners lee
BOM2 mit every students an entrepreneur
BOM21 MIT100k
BOM3 mit media lab -open source wizard entrepreneurs and new commons
BOM30 Negroponte $100 Laptop
BOM31 Joi Ito
BOM32 reclaim our learning
BOM4 MIT open education movement
BIM41 OLA
BOM5 Legatum
BO51 Legatum millennials and fans
BOM52 networks of cashless banking technolgists
BOM53 innovations journal
BOM6 partners in health/brigham womens hospital
BOM61 value chain networks club inspired by pih and world bank millenials
BOM62 ypchronic
BOM63 GFH
BOM64 Haiti training hospital - connector of neraly free nursing college
BOSF1 Kiva and puddle
BOSF2 Khan Academy
BOSF3 Coursera segment interested in Open Learning Campus

communications and community banking links series 1 and 2

Out of The Economist since 1972 Macrae's viewpoint Entrepreneurial Revolution argues that the net generation can make tremendous human progress if and only if educators, economists and all who make the biggest resource integrate youth job creating into the way their worldwide purpose and impact is valued -chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk join in ... 43rd Entrepreneurial Revolution Youth Networks Celebration..
 


job creation survey

discuss valuation video

Norman Macrae Foundation

e chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

Wash DC tel 1 301 881 1655

 

 

 

For how many of The Economist's first 175 years was it the most effective mediator of sustainability exponentials of humanity all over the planet

 

best million-youth moocs hosted by economists

-------------

discuss valuation video

hottest youth-spring question of our life and times-can online education end youth unemployment for ever ? yes but only if you help map how!

moocyunus launches youtube competition -what would purpose of youth's favorite free online university be?

join blog of moocyunus

 

 The Economist- when first seeing youth experiment with digital networks in 1972,

Season's most urgent collaboration debates:

next 100 million jobs nursing

42nd year of 7 wonders if thinkpad of The Economist's genre of Entrepreneurial Revoution

40 years of notes from archives of entrepreneurial revolution 1-7 a...

 

help catalogue top 100 microfranchises

 

help catalogue 100 short videos on right old muddle of anti-youth economists..

Dad (Norman Macrae) created the genre Entrepreneurial Revolution  to debate how to make the net generation the most productive and collaborative . We had first participated in computer assisted learning experiments in 1972. Welcome to more than 40 years of linking pro-youth economics networks- debating can the internet be the smartest media our species has ever collaborated around?

.

Foundation Norman Macrae- The Economist's Pro-Youth Economist

5801 Nicholson Lane Suite 404 Rockville MD 20852   tel 301 881 1655 email chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

Main Project webs wholeplanet.tv

microeducationsummit.com including yunusdiary.com bracnet.ning.com taddyblecher.com as lead open education partner of mandela elders and branson 

NormanMacrae.ning.com

2013 = 170th Year of The Economist being Founded to End Hunger

2010s = Worldwide Youth's most productive and collaborative decade

 1972: Norman Macrae starts up Entrepreneurial Revolution debates in The Economist. Will we the peoples be in time to change 20th C largest system designs and make 2010s worldwide youth's most productive time? or will we go global in a way that ends sustainability of ever more villages/communities? Drayton was inspired by this genre to coin social entrepreneur in 1978 ,,continue the futures debate here

world favorite moocs-40th annual top 10 league table

  • 1) e-ME
  • 2) 8 week tour of grameen curriculum and uniting human race to poverty museums
  • 3) 8 week tour of brac curriculum and mapping microeducation summit for post 2015 milennium goals

send votes to chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk , Macrae Foundation

  • 4) 8 week tour of africa's free university and entrepreneurial slums
  • 5 what to do now for green energy to save the world in time
  • 6 nurses as 21st world's favorite information grassroots networkers and most economical cheerleaders more

 

 

  • 7 how food security as a mising curricululum of middle schools can co-create more jobs than any nation can dream of
  • 8 pro-youth economics and public servants
  • 9 celebrating china as number 1 creditor nation
  • 10 questions worldwide youth are asking about what was true last decade but false this decade because that's what living in the most innovative era means chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

archives at The Economist



 

Number 1 in Economics for Youth

The unacknowledged giantcelebrate unacknowledged giant

dannyboyle chrispatten butler-sloss marianowak tomhunter MYunusgeorgesoros bernerslee michael palin

Timeless ER from The Economist's Unacknowledged Giant (aka dad Norman Macrae) A  b  c ;;1997 a;;; 1983 a ;;;1976 a b;;; 1972 a ;;; 1962 a 1956 a - correspndence with optimistic rationalists always welcome - chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

 

from chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk please help in 2 ways -nomination of collaboration 100; testify to world's largest public broadcasters such as BBCthat this survey needs their mediation now

Intercapital searches for replicable youth eonomic franchise

.Japan

Bangladesh

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Atlanta.
Paris
Turkey.
Dhaka.
Austria
Boston
Brussels Poland
China
Switzerland
Princeton-Nashville
London-Glasgow Nordica: S D N
Canada
Austin
Spain .Kenya
Brazil Joburg
Oregon/CA
Germany
.S.Africa
.India

 

 

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